Consumer Driven IT in Review – 23rd edition

If there is anything I have learned over the last year writing about IT consumerization, it is that there is simply no longer a dividing line between “enterprise” and “consumer,” particularly when it comes to devices. With the success of bring-your-own-device (BYOD) policies, new security approaches, and the easy availability of cloud-based apps and SaaS, there isn’t much that an enterprise employee can’t do (securely) with an iPad that they could do with a traditional Windows-based device — with the possible exception of Flash-based video. I was working in corporate America in the ’80s when Apple introduced the Macintosh, and while we all thought it was “cool,” no one thought it would have any impact on corporate computing because there were so many applications that didn’t run on it. Fast forward to 2012 and it doesn’t matter – in many ways, the iPad can be thought of as a current version of the ’70s and ’80s-era “dumb terminal,” at least with respect to running corporate apps. But this time you get to run Angry Birds, too!


Yet despite all this, last week the CEO of the world’s largest computer supplier (by revenue) stated that the company will release a tablet later this year aimed mainly at “businesses rather than consumers.” She claimed the company decided to design a tablet that’s “desirable” to workers while including security and durability features, rather than trying to take on Apple’s iPad directly. “Make no mistake about it, the consumer tablet market today is an Apple market” she said.


While I wish this company good luck with its efforts (full disclosure: I was employed there for a year after they acquired the Houston-based company where I worked, and I still have many friends there who I would like to see keep their jobs), I sincerely question the success of this strategy in today’s “the consumer is king” world.


What do you think? Can a vendor succeed with a tablet device in the enterprise market that has limited success in the consumer market?


Here’s what was in the IT consumerization news in the last two weeks:


August 29: 4 common mistakes when mixing social and marketing by Joe Ruiz via WindMill Networking
Strategy and planning is key, as is spending more time listening and less time talking.


August 28: When IT is the BYOD security threat by Chris Nerney via CITEWorld
Twenty percent of IT still doesn’t believe BYOD is happening or is a problem, leaving organizations open to all kinds of security issues.


August 27: Who’s leading mobile apps efforts? Not IT by Paul Krill via Infoworld
New survey by vendor AppCentral shows increasing role for business unit, marketing and executive-level budgets in funding mobile projects.


August 26: CIO as IT supply chain manager by Ken Oestreich via Gigaom
Although the role may be changing, the CIO is even more important (and strategic) than before.


August 24: 3 rules for doing BYOD right by Galen Gruman via InfoWorld
This article provides great advice on making BYOD work for employees while not over-burdening IT.


August 24: Big data is important, but open data is more valuable by Nathan Eddy via eWeek
David Newman of Gartner believes that for clients seeking competitive advantage through direct interactions with customers, partners and suppliers, open data is the solution.


August 23: BYOD management using a device catalog by Keith Townsend via TechTarget
A BYOD catalog gives users a choice of devices and approved applications within the scope of supported configurations and a consistent end-user experience.


August 23: Prepare for IT change via CIO
Endeavour Energy CIO Ian Robinson says meeting the needs of users while balancing security and budget needs will help CIOs stay relevant in the future, particularly in the face of BYOD.


August 22: Meet your company’s Chief Customer Officer by Fatemeh Khatibloo via HBR
Customer intelligence is at an organizational inflection point and CI’s value extends well beyond the marketing organization. But what does a successful CI professional’s future look like? The answer lies in the rise of a new type of executive, the Chief Customer Officer.


August 22: A paid subscription to Twitter and Facebook? by Peter Himler via Forbes
Now that Twitter has changed the rules governing its API, who knows what else is on the horizon.


August 21: Big Data survey smorgasbord by Andrew Brust via ZDNet
This link provides lots of great data here from several recent surveys.


August 21: HP targets Apple IT Consumerization with Windows 8 blitz by Stephen Burke via CRN
Some might say it is too little too late, but HP as well as Microsoft itself is putting a lot of muscle behind the Windows 8 rollout.


August 21: Four questions to ask before starting a Big Data initiative by Reda Chouffani via CIO
Before starting you need to know what data you’ll need, how you’ll get it, how you’ll use it and what you expect to learn from it. Learn how to start answering those questions in this post.

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Jackie Kahle

Jackie is a 30-year veteran of the IT industry and has held senior management positions in marketing, business development, and strategic planning for major systems, software, and services companies including Hewlett-Packard, Compaq, and Gartner. She currently manages the strategy and execution of CA Technologies thought leadership programs. Jackie has an MBA from the Whittemore School, University of New Hampshire, a BA in Mathematics from New York University and is the Vice-Chair of the N.H. State Council on the Arts.

This article has 1 comment

  1. I agree with you completely! And while it would be easy to sell “the world’s largest computer supplier (by revenue)” short, it’s just as easy and move convenient to buy AAPL on dips.

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